Alpacas help youth

Year nine student Cody Whalebone-Attewell with Chuckles the alpaca who have worked together through the Trade Training Pathways rural studies course and will go on to exhibit at the Royal Melbourne Show.

Year nine student Cody Whalebone-Attewell with Chuckles the alpaca who have worked together through the Trade Training Pathways rural studies course and will go on to exhibit at the Royal Melbourne Show.

An initiative aiming to reconnect youth at risk through caring for alpacas is seeking $40,000 funding through the state government’s “Pick my Project” program.

Community College Gippsland trainer Louise Lazarus has successfully introduced alpacas to a year nine rural studies program at CCG.

But, Louise also is turning her focus to a program that she believes has the potential to help young people reconnect to their community.

If successful, funding for the “Re-connecting Young People at Risk” project will enable Education Centre Gippsland students to work hands-on with alpacas to enhance their personal development and build skills that further improve their employability.

She said by working with alpacas, the students would learn the importance of responsibility, resilience and empathy.

Participants will be working with alpacas to help gain trust, enabling young people at risk to reconnect and give them a sense of purpose and a focus on something other than themselves.


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