Circle of magic

Ebony Strauss, left, and Ella McIntosh check for fairies underneath the mushrooms growing at Warragul Primary School.

Ebony Strauss, left, and Ella McIntosh check for fairies underneath the mushrooms growing at Warragul Primary School.

Warragul & Drouin Gazette, April 21, 2015

The first day back at school can be a bit of a drag but a sense of magic hung over Warragul Primary School all day on Monday.
In the middle of the school oval was a perfectly formed mushroom ring, or fairy ring as they are often called.
Principal Rosemary Allica said the ring was a source of fascination, with pupils returning to marvel at it all through the day.
She asked the pupils to enjoy the ring but try to preserve it for others to see, and it was intact at the end of the day.
The pupils were invited to bring their parents back for a look after school.
As the name suggests, fairy rings are the stuff of legend worldwide. Some Western European cultures treat them as places to avoid – the home of elves, fairies and goblins – while others link them to good fortune.
Judging by the smiles on the faces of pupils on Monday, the latter interpretation prevailed.
The mushroom ring prompted lots of different reactions.
Ebony Strauss had looked them up on the internet and reported that they grew in a special type of soil.
Her friend Ella McIntosh was more interested in their culinary potential. “Mushrooms are round and very yum,” she said.


    Posted in Warragul Primary School

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